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by Jeff St. John
May 22, 2020

California's big regulatory push to open a vibrant market for microgrids is running behind schedule and has not yet solved several key problems. The effort yielded no workable proposals for the 2020 fire season, when PG&E is once again set to rely heavily on diesel generators.

It's still not clear how third-party developers and communities will be able to build microgrids that provide local resilience while getting paid adequately for their services to the state's increasingly renewable-powered grid. But early missteps aside, the California Public Utilities Commission is pushing ahead on at least some of the work mandated by AB 1339, the 2018 state law that created it.