1,500-Volt PV Systems and Components 2016-2020: Costs, Vendors, and Forecasts

by Scott Moskowitz

The utility solar PV market is undergoing a significant transformation as demand grows around the world. With much of this growth driven by continued cost reductions, we are beginning to see a transition to 1,500 volt DC systems. Higher voltage systems minimize balance of systems requirments and contribute to lower overall PV system costs. Similar to the global switch from 600 volt to 1,000 volt PV systems that occured in 2012 and 2013, we expect the transition to occur rapidly as the supply chain scales and the value proposition is proven.

GTM Research expects 1,500 volt systems to make up 9.2 percent of PV installations over 1 megawatt in 2016, accounting for 4.6 gigawatts of demand.

Global Landscape of Announced 1,500 Volt PV Products, December 2015

Source: GTM Research

This new report describes the value proposition and cost implications for higher voltage PV systems as well as regulations and restrictions. This is the only available research that provides a detailed forecast by geography and outlines the supply chain and vendor landscape for the global 1,500 volt market.


Please contact Zack Munsell (zmunsell@gtmresearch.com) for more information.

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Download a free brochure with a full table of contents and list of figures, as well as more in-depth information on the report's analysis.

Scott Moskowitz Senior Analyst, Solar

Scott Moskowitz is a Senior Analyst at GTM Research in the Solar PV Systems and Technologies practice, where his research focuses on PV system design, inverters, balance-of-system components and global downstream markets. In addition to tracking the global landscape of PV projects and balance-of-systems vendors, Scott was the Assistant Editor of PV News, the solar industry’s longest-running market research periodical. Before joining GTM Research, Scott was active with Engineers Without Borders, where he co-led a water and sanitation implementation project in the Peruvian Amazon. Scott holds a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering and mathematics from Vanderbilt University and a master’s degree in environmental engineering from the University of California, Davis, where his work focused on energy efficiency, life cycle analysis and environmental law.

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